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How To Catch Wipers

How To Catch Wipers

Predictably, this cross between white bass and striped bass has many characteristics of both parents. It is smaller than a striper but larger than a white bass. It shares the aggressiveness and predatory natures of both. Most anglers who have the good fortune to catch them agree that they are some of the hardest fighting fish for their size anywhere. Wipers are sterile hybrids. Since they do not reproduce they are usually planted and
managed to control excessive populations of baitfish or unwanted smaller species. Anglers never seem to complain about having them in their local lakes. The good news for floatation fishermen is that wipers are easily caught from tubes and toons. The bad news is that they tend to cruise around a lot and if you do not have mobility you may have trouble finding them. But, whenever you are good enough or lucky enough to get your craft within casting range of some wipers you can have some wild action until they move on.

Wipers are tough and they will put your best tackle to the test. They average less than ten pounds in most waters and they can be tamed on medium bass tackle. Wiper specialists usually favor rods with backbone, reels with good drags and tough line with good knot strength and abrasion resistance. Most wipers are taken by trollers, pulling crankbaits, jigs, spoons or spinners around to find the scattered fish. Once active fish are found you can shut down the motor and cast for them. During late summer through fall wipers often chase baitfish to the surface and create splashy boils. If you are fortunate enough to get on a boil you can catch wipers on just about anything that looks close to what they are feeding on. This is a great time for the fly flingers to experience the hard strike and fierce fight of these great battlers.

When wipers are not in a surface feeding mode you can catch them by dragging a minnow or a crawler behind your tube or toon just as if you were fishing for catfish. And, while you are dragging bait you can make casts around your craft with crankbaits, jigs or other lures, trying to pick up a more active fish or two. Just be sure you are properly licensed and permitted to use more
than one rod. And, if you hook a wiper, with two lines in the water, you are in for a rodeo. They tend to make big circles around you. Besides making you dizzy they can tangle that second line.